Abolition of Sati by Lord William Bentinck - GKToday.

Lord William Bentinck and his reforms (1828-1835) Posted on: 24-11-2018 Posted by: Admin. Introduction. Lord William Bentinck assumed the office of the Governor- General in 1828. Born in 1774 he commenced his career as a soldier and later at the young age of twenty two he became a Member of Parliament. He was appointed the Governor of Madras in 1803. He supported Sir Thomas Munroe on.

Lord William Bentinck was responsible for the abolition of Sati and Thugee. Both of these customs involved death. The only difference was that in case of Sati the death took place voluntarily and in the case of Thugee it was inflicted by the Thugs on others. The custom of Sati involved the death of a widowed woman because as it was in favour of the vested interests of many of the family.

Social Reforms of Lord Bentinck, Reforms of Lord Bentinck.

Reforms Made by Lord William Bentick The appointment of Lord William Bentick as the Governor-General of India marked .Lord William Bentick who paid attention to any new administrative reforms and. This website includes study notes, research papers, essays, articles and .Lord William Bentinck - Wikipedia Lieutenant-General Lord William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck GCB GCH PC (14 September.Lord William Bentinck and the Reform of Education BY GEOFFREY SEED FROM about the year 1823 the education of the people had been a matter of increasing concern to those responsible for the administration of the East India Company's territories in India. The authorities both in London and in India began to recognize that it was closely connected with the carrying out of the plans and policies.Lord William Bentinck (1823-1836) The first governor-general of India; Suppression of thugee through regulation. Abolition of sati through regulation XVII of 1829 declaring sati illegal. Charter Act of 1833.It opened the services for the Indians without discrimination. Educational reforms and introduction of English as the official language.


Bentinck was greatly distressed when he received a report of 800 cases of sati in a single year and that from Bengal. He determined to abolish this practice which he considered an offence against natural justice. Therefore, he became a crusader against it and promulgated his Regulation XVII on 4 December 1829 prohibiting the practice of sati. Those who practiced sati were made liable for.Estimate of Lord William Bentinck. Bentinck was a “straightforward, honest, upright, benevolent, sensible man”. His social reforms such as abolition of sati and prevention of child sacrifice eradicated age old evils from Hindu society. It is heartwarming to note that “Bentinck acted where others had talked”.

Following reforms were introduced by Lord William Bentinck: The first reform done was to abolish the Provincial Courts of Appeal and Circuit Courts altogether. This was done by a regulation passed in 1829. In place of the Provincial courts of appeal and Circuit,. 20 divisions and each division was placed under a separate commissioner.

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Sati: Official Documents, Lord William Cavendish Bentinck. See: Sati. After having lost most of their first empire in north America, the British stabilized the basis for their second empire by expanding their territorial control in India through the instrument of their East India Company. Lord William Cavendish Bentinck (1774-1839), the second son in an aristocratic, landed family, had entered.

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Lord William Bentinck (1828) Object details: Object ID: HIL0243: Description: Scale: 1:48. Plan showing the inboard profile for 'Lord William Bentinck' (1828), a 123ft, three-masted merchant ship. Mould Loft Number 69. The Lloyd's Survey Report (LON2338) confirms the builder, dimensions and tonnage, as well as notes that in 1829 she had part of her keel replaced in consequence of 'having been.

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Lord William Bentinck voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1838 with 320 passengers. Convict Description Convicted At; John Abell: John Abell, one of 320 convicts transported on the Lord William Bentinck, 11 April 1838: Southampton Assizes: Edmund (The Younger) Adcock: Edmund Adcock (The younger), one of 320 convicts transported on the Lord William Bentinck, 11 April 1838: Norfolk.

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Lord William Bentinck assumed the office of the Governor- General in 1828. Born in 1774 he commenced his career as a soldier and later at the young age of twenty two he became a Member of Parliament. He was appointed the Governor of Madras in 1803. He supported Sir Thomas Munroe on revenue administration. The Vellore Mutiny of 1806 had resulted in Bentinck’s recall.

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Some of the British administrators like Lord William Bentinck had evinced personal interest in the matter. There were primarily two areas in which laws were enacted, laws pertaining to women emancipation and the caste system. Social Laws Concerning Wome: The condition of women, by the time the British established their rule, was not encouraging. Several evil practices such as the practice of.

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Lord William Bentinck. This vessel, a barque of 444 tons, was built in 1832, and spent her early career as a passenger ferry on the Ganges river in India. She was hired and fitted out for her hew role as emigrant ship during 1840, and made four voyages to New Zealand with passengers and cargo. The first of these was to Wellington - she left Gravesend on 7 January 1841 under Captain Crow and.

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Lord William Bentinck assumed the office of the Governor- General in 1828. Born in 1774 he commenced his career as a soldier and later at the young age of twenty two he became a Member of Parliament. He was appointed the Governor of Madras in 1803. He supported Sir Thomas Munroe on revenue administration. The Vellore Mutiny of 1806 had resulted in Bentinck’s recall. However, his appointment.

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Lord Dalhousie had introduced a number of reforms in the field of education. The Government did not take any step for the promotion of vernacular education. In 1854 Sir Charles Wood, the President of the Board of Control sent his recommendations known as “Wood’s Despatch of 1854” to India reorganizing the whole structure of education.

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Of course, his single biggest contribution was to influence the thinking of the British administrators in abolishing Sati. He campaigned vociferously with the Lord Bentinck, and the Sati was abolished in 1829, just a year after the Brahmo Samaj was formed. This was truly the age of reforms. The British had grand plans of ruling India. The.

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